Guest on board!

Since owning Blue Tale, we’ve only had one guest that stayed onboard for a few days; most visitors only spend a few hours on the boat but never seem to want to stay longer… is it the small space? Or the fact that our toilet (referred to as the head) needs to be flushed manually and requires a small lecture on its use? It was a very special occasion when one of Rob’s sisters, Lesley, made the long flight over from Toronto to come and stay with us for a few days on Blue Tale to enjoy sailing around the southern part of the Gulf Islands.

Lesley arrived on February 25th at the Victoria International Airport, which is actually located in Sidney, BC, not Victoria and is about 25 minutes from Tsehum Harbour where we were anchored and waiting for her arrival.

Anchor stuck on a crab pod

Anchor stuck on a crab pod

After a brief dinghy ride to our boat, the first order of business was to show her around, go through safety procedures, how to use the freshwater foot pumps, and of course the head!  After living on the boat for a year, I’ve forgotten how intimidating it can be to be on a boat and to even use the head.

After a warm bowl of homemade chili (it was raining again), we set of for Ganges, about 16 nautical miles north (nm) from Tsehum Harbour. Unfortunately, Lesley slept for most of the 4 hours it took us to get there; because of her fear of seasickness she took some fast acting Gravol that put her out for the trip. We only stayed the night and enjoyed a pint at the pub. The following morning we enjoyed a nice walk around town and then we pulled the anchor and set off to Montague Harbour, one of our favourite locations in the Gulf Islands and also an easy anchorage, as we only needed to grab one of the marine park mooring buoys.

Bringing up the anchor

Bringing up the anchor

Lesley sailing

Lesley sailing

Ganges Harbour with a plane landing

Ganges Harbour with a plane landing

Ganges Harbour

Ganges Harbour

Tree House Cafe in Ganges

Tree House Cafe in Ganges

Saltspring Coffee

Saltspring Coffee

The Ganges Village Cobbler

The Ganges Village Cobbler

Friday morning (February 27th) we left Montague Harbour early, as we were concerned with the high wind weather forecasted.  Once we entered Samson Channel we sailed but the predicted strong winds never came. We headed for Port Browning and anchored for the night. Port Browning was our opportunity to get clean showers and a nice walk in; however, that night we experienced the worst anchorage we’ve ever had to date. We stayed here the week before in almost the same spot and it was great, but this trip, even though the weather was really nice, we had a combination of north winds, with south swells rolling in, and the tidal action causing the boat to pitch sides ways making it very uncomfortable. We felt very much like being an insect in a jar and being shook around by a small child. Lesley took it in stride, took some Gravol and went to bed; she woke the next morning refreshed and ready for some coffee. Rob and I did not enjoy the same bliss as his sister as we were up half the night worrying if the anchor was going to drag or not. Luckily, the anchor stayed and Saturday morning we headed back to Tsehum Harbour. The sun was out, the wind was out and we had a wonderful sailing day for our last day together.

All sails up

All sails up

Lesley and Rob

Lesley and Rob

Our boat might be small but it is very cosy and actually quiet comfortable for three people….for short periods of time. Rob and I are still amazed that a couple with 3 teenage kids sailed around on another Westail 32 for 7 years! ~Sophia & Rob

Coast Guard

Coast Guard

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4 responses to “Guest on board!

  1. Thank you for a great visit. Your post doesn’t show it – but you are both wonderful hosts. For the record: Sophia bakes bread. On a boat! Rob INSISTED I wear his slippers to keep my feet warm. They gave me their bed!! Why I left I don’t know. 🙂

  2. Hi Rob and Sophie,
    We enjoy reading your sailing blog, even when you’re in the freezing cold at home. We’ve also noted how many friends and family come to our boat, have dinner, sail for a day, but they don’t seem to want to sleep on the boat or travel for a couple of days. Perhaps the confined space is uncomfortable, the airhead, no shower, the lack of privacy? So we try to include places that will allow shore services. I think we’re a special group of people to feel so comfortable on our boats that interior space has literally increased for us. No matter, we’re just happy to share our boat for any amount of time we can.
    How much longer will you be sailing before returning to work? I hope you have the opportunity to head South and beyond very soon.
    Take care, fair winds to you both! Diane and John Clark, SV Konami, Portland, Oregon

    • Hey Diane, Thank you of the response. I really believe that people are missing out by not staying out for over nighters. Life is much slower on a boat while on the hook. My sister really enjoyed herself and was really keen on learning. The head and the dinghy were a bit a of a learning curve for her, the head more of an operational mystery. Your airhead must really create some questions and head scratching?? Do you have a blogsite and what kind of boat are you on; live aboard?
      Rob

      • Hi Rob,
        It’s really great when guests actually want to learn, much more enjoyable for all. The airhead is very simple to use, and yes, very manual. Some of our day guests have used it and were fine with the operation. The instructions are always amusing. We’re have been live aboards nearly 4 years. Getting ready to leave Portland, Oregon for the So Pacific this summer. Our sailing blog is konamisailing.wordpress.com
        We’ll be posting as we sail. We have SSB and Sailmail. It’s been quite an undertaking the last 6 years getting the boat and ourselves ready, but we’re very excited about the adventure!

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