Ice Inuksuk

Our neighbour took advantage of the hard pack snow that was created after the last blizzard to build an ice inuksuk.  The snow has been perfectly blown and compacted by the wind that all he had to do was carve out the blocks to be able to put together the inuksuk.  This is the same type of snow that you would need to build an igloo – snow with enough structural strength to be cut and stacked appropriately.

Ice Inuksuk - each part is one piece of snow block!

Ice Inuksuk – each part is one piece of snow block!

Ice Inuksuk - each leg part was about 4 feet tall

Ice Inuksuk – each leg part was about 4 feet tall

Inuksuit (plural for inuksuk) are structures that are found throughout the Arctic circle from Alaska all the way to Greenland and built by the people in the Arctic regions.  Inuksuit can come in different forms and is usually a stone landmark or cairn that was built for a variety of purposes; from being used for navigation, as a point of reference, a marker for travel routes,fishing spots, camps, hunting grounds, to mark a food cache or to mark an important location such as a place of respect, a memorial for a beloved one or a place of veneration.  In my travels around Nunavut, most of the communities have at least one or two Inuksuit but I have to say that so far Igloolik has the most impressive ones I’ve seen in size and in number.

A group of Inuksuks in Igloolik - they line up perfectly and seem to direct you across the water

A group of Inuksuks in Igloolik – they line up perfectly and seem to direct you across the water

One of the many Inuksuks around Igloolik

One of the many Inuksuks around Igloolik

Inuksuk on the land in Igloolik

Inuksuk on the land in Igloolik

How these were built by people, I don't know!  The opening between the 'legs' were taller than me and I'm not short!

How these were built by people, I don’t know! The opening between the ‘legs’ were taller than me and I’m not that short!

Today, inuksuit continue to serve as an Inuit cultural symbol and increasingly serving as a mainstream Canadian symbol.  It is shown on the flag and coat of arms for the Nunavut territory.  Markers have been erected throughout Canada, used as the mascot logo for the 2010 Winter Olympics and even donated by the Canadian government to other countries. ~ Sophia

Inuksuks in Cambridge Bay build by Rob

Inuksuks in Cambridge Bay build by Rob

Rankin Inlet Inuksuk

Rankin Inlet Inuksuk

Is it a caribou?  An Inuksuk in Coral Harbour in the shape of an animal

Is it a caribou? An Inuksuk in Coral Harbour in the shape of an animal

Inukshuk at Sylvia Grinnell Territorial Park (photo taken July 2012)

Inukshuk at Sylvia Grinnell Territorial Park (photo taken July 2012)

Red sky sunset over Inukshuk near Baker Lake

Red sky sunset over Inukshuk near Baker Lake
A baby inuksuk in Baker Lake built on top of a rock

A baby inuksuk in Baker Lake built on top of a rock

Traditional Norwegian-style cairn (memorial) that marks the location of the Queen Maud ship in Cambridge Bay

Traditional Norwegian-style cairn (memorial) that marks the location of the Queen Maud ship in Cambridge Bay
People Inuksuks

People Inuksuks

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