Walking around Iqaluit

Rob and I spend the weekend in Iqaluit instead of coming home to Baker Lake as planned.  Rob was asked to go to Pond Inlet for work and the only flight last week to the community from Iqaluit was on Sunday.  I decided to stay longer and spent the weekend with him as he was going to be away for a week.  On Saturday, we walked around town taking photos but the weather was not as great as it has been during the week.  We got caught in a small shower on our way to one of the best places in town to eat – the Yummy Shawarma place!!  But we did get some great photos even if we did get a bit soaked!

A different view of Iqaluit-at low tide

A different view of Iqaluit-at low tide

Walking among the shacks

Walking among the shacks

Rob looking at one of the older boats!

Rob looking at one of the older boats!

Waiting for the tide

Waiting for the tide

Lost in time - some of the old boats used by Hudson Bay Company to bring in freight

Lost in time – some of the old boats used by Hudson Bay Company to bring in freight

Old schooner boat used to distribute freight

Old schooner boat used to distribute freight

Another old boat lost in time

Another old boat lost in time

Iqaluit is the territorial capital of Nunavut and tends to be a very transient place.  Many people travel through Iqaluit to go to the Baffin region communities or they travel to Iqaluit for business meetings.    Iqaluit was founded as an American air base in the 40’s to provide a stop-over and refueling site to support the war effort in Europe and was known as Frobisher Bay until 1987.  The water surrounding Iqaluit is still referred to as Frobisher Bay and is a very active bay both during the summer and the winter.  In summer, fishing boats are heading in and out of the community and barges arrive bringing the annual sealift.  In winter, it is snowmachining and dog sledding on the bay.

Sedna - is the goddess of the sea and marine animals in Inuit mythology

Sedna – is the goddess of the sea and marine animals in Inuit mythology

Beluga whale

Beluga whale

Window in time

Window in time

Waiting for the snow - Qamutik (Inuit sled)

Waiting for the snow – Qamutik (Inuit sled)

One of the sheds someone is living in.

One of the sheds someone is living in.

Iqaluit is also one of two communities in Nunavut that has piped water and sewage systems in place instead of having to rely on trucked systems for delivery of water and wastewater disposal.  Rankin Inlet is the other community.  So people don’t have to worry about running out of water while taking a shower!  Of course, Iqaluit also comes with other amenities you would expect from a large town (not a city); movie theater, swimming pool, a few restaurants, a couple of bars and a corrections facility!

Water booster station

Water booster station

Qamutiq building - named after the Inuit sled

Qamutiq building – named after the Inuit sled

Inuit graffiti

Inuit graffiti

Dog and his master

Dog and his master

Inuit art

Inuit art

A large carving!

A large carving!

Playing the drum

Playing the drum

Muskox statue

Muskox statue

I travelled back to Baker Lake on Sunday while Rob travelled on to Pond Inlet for work as mentioned before.  My bag of course did not make it all the way and got lost in Rankin Inlet.  Rob will hopefully be back by Friday unless he has to travel somewhere else for work.  Ah, the fun of working and living in the north! – Sophia

Multi-lingual sign

Multi-lingual sign

Speed sign in English and Inuktitut

Speed sign in English and Inuktitut

Funky stop sign!

Funky stop sign!

Interesting sign - no snowmachining on the sidewalk!

Interesting sign – no snowmachining on the sidewalk!

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